Author Topic: Polish Pierogi or Russian Pierogi recipes--are there differences?  (Read 2378 times)

CinnamonBear

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Are Polish-style pierogi and Russian-style pierogi recipes virtually the same?

I ask this because I've eaten pierogi dishes in Russian restaurants, and these are a bit different from the frozen, freezer case variety of pierogies you find in the US grocery stores.

The Russian ones I've had in various restaurants were always filled with meat. Is there a difference between pierogies in Poland or in Russia?

claudine

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I'm not a food expert, but in Poland we call 'pierogi ruskie' pierogi with cooked potatoes and cheese. And when I say just 'pierogi', I mean pierogi with meat or fruits. I've never heard anybody saying 'polish pierogi'.

Jessi

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See, and I know 'perogies' to mean potato-based ones. My ex-boyfriend's family was all Ukrainian/Polish and his mom's recipes are what I had always used. There was no specification that they were potato-filled....that's just what was expected. Even the dough had potatoes in it.

I have since had ones with other fillings and those would've been called "meat perogies" or something to specify. It's interesting how various terms and labels get mixed up and changed when they're passed on or used in different areas.

Jessi

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Hmmm, interesting:

Quote
There is a traditional Russian dish called "pirogí" (пироги), which sounds similar to Polish "pierogi" but is a different dish. The Russian variant of Polish pierogi or Ukrainian varenyky is varéniki (вареники) or pelʹméni (пельмени). They are most often filled with meat, rice and meat, potatoes with mushrooms, cheese, cabbage, meat, berries. They can be topped with fried onions and bacon, or butter, and served with sour cream.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierogi

That makes sense. And I would refer to meat-filled dumplings as pelmeni (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pelmeni), even if they were the same size or shape as perogies, so maybe that's where the distinction on my end is coming from.

steph84

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I always think of Polish ones as being meet filled and Russian ones as being filled with potatoes and cheese. That is based on eating them in the U.S. I don't know if that is just a naming system.